If You Don’t Stop Tolerating Things, You May Hate Yourself Later

  • I’m a firm believer that tolerating things that bother us is a really bad idea. How many times have you said about something, “It’s tolerable.” Or, “I can stand it.” Most of the time, I think we’re “standing” things we don’t have to stand.

    As a rule, I think tolerating something is a waste of time and effort, and generally causes our lives to be less enjoyable, satisfying and fulfilling than they need to be. I just don’t see why anything needs to be tolerated.

    Sometimes you need to put your foot down.




    David B. Bohl in Christine Louise Hohlbaum’s The Power of Slow: 101 Ways to Save Time in Our 24/7 World

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    This from Amazon.com:

    Editorial Reviews

    “The Power of Slow is a life-changing book. Far from stating the obvious, Christine Hohlbaum provides new insights and persuasive arguments for reshaping our time and changing our lives for the better. A must read in our over-scheduled world!”–Wendy Walker, author of Social Lives, Four Wives, and Chicken Soup for the Soul – Power Moms

    “In the fast-paced world of Blackberrys, Iphones, and Twitter, it’s hard to find one’s footing. In an easy-to-read style, Ms. Hohlbaum has described a process of slowing down that is so very important to our wholeness, balance, and well being. She does so in a poetic and sometimes humorous way. She has captured a heavy topic with a light touch and yet we learn many lessons.  I highly recommend this book to help anyone who wants to stay healthy, sane, and enjoy life more fully.”–Bonnie Michaels, work-life balance expert and author of Solving the Work/Family Puzzle and A Journey of Work-Life Renewal

    Product Description

    Getting to the heart of our hassled and over-scheduled existence, Christine Louise Hohlbaum cheerfully investigates 101 ways to increase our quality of life and productivity by reevalu ating how we perceive and use time. She claims that everyone has their own personal bank account of time. We cannot control time itself, but we can manage the activities within the time we do have. The Power of Slow gives readers practical, concise directions to change the relationship they have with time and debunks the myths of multitasking, speed, and urgency as the only ways to efficiency.

    Recession Proof Thinking

  • thinkingby David Bohl

    Have you been affected by the recession? I surely have, and so have most of us, right? Our economy has gone through some pretty startling changes in the last year or two.

    I believe that how we react to these changes will determine whether we prosper or fail, as individuals, and as a nation. Will you wave the white flag and hope that better days are coming, or will you adapt and overcome? I choose the latter. Whether you call it a “down-turn”, “recession”, “slow-down”, or even the dreaded “DEPRESSION”, the truth is that it is up to you to use our changing economy as an opportunity to excel.

    Don’t Drink the Kool-Aid.

    We’ve all been hearing it in the media. Every other commercial is advertising a “recession proof” this, or a “beat the slow-down” that. The television news has been falling all over themselves covering the recession ad nauseum. If you listened to all this hype you might believe the world was coming to an end. It isn’t.

    It’s hard to find quality information on the news these days. What you can easily find is infinite quantities of spin and hype. Don’t focus on the gloom and doom, sensationalist reporting. Stay positive, even if times have gotten tough. You’ll be fine, but you’re probably going to have to make a few changes.

    Do Something Different.

    The other day, a friend was telling me about his woes. “I’m a union carpenter, and I haven’t worked in six months. I’ve never seen it this bad”, he says. I got the sense that this man was prepared to wait another six months, or more, for things to get better.

    In the meantime there are other union carpenters – smarter, more industrious ones who are already making their moves. They are becoming entrepreneurial, and going into business for themselves. They aren’t going to sit and wait for the union to save them, they are going to make things happen now. These are the kinds of folks who will prosper through difficult and changing times while others shake their heads and blame “the recession”.


    When money gets tight, we need to re-think our business model. Say, for example, your hours have been cut. You went from 40 to 30 hours per week. It is probably time to find a source of supplemental income. Pick a skill or a talent that you have and market it.

    Say, for example, you play the guitar. If you’ve been at it for a while, then you probably have knowledge and information that is worth money. Put an ad on Craigslist, or something similar, and start giving guitar lessons. Get yourself a few good customers and you’ll be right back where you were in terms of income, and you’ll be doing something different and presumably more enjoyable in the process.

    If you’re not sure what to do, then make a list of your skills. We all have them – things like: gardening, tennis, piano, second language, computer, etc. Now put a possible way to earn money next to each skill. Go from there, and you’ll be on your way to leveraging your individual skills to earn extra cash.

    Most of us believe that we have made something out of ourselves through hard work, and smart decision making. In this country we have to earn what we have. We aren’t born entitled, and there are no free rides. The economy has made some pretty tough circumstances for most of us. Nobody is denying that, but, it is important to recognize that we are dealing with exactly that – circumstances.

    I will never surrender and become a victim of circumstance. We will all persevere and meet these challenges as long as we keep things in their proper perspective. Tune out the hype and negativity, get back to the basics of hard work and opportunism. Let the tough times weed out the defeatists, and we and our economy will come through this recession stronger than ever.

    What to Do When There’s Nothing to Do

  • what-to-doHave you ever woken up on a Saturday morning and said to yourself or a family member, “What are we going to do today? There’s nothing to do…”? Or it’s a holiday week off from work or school and you’re out of your routine and you ask the same question, “What’s there to do? I’m bored.”

    Personally, I’ve never been bored a day in my life, but for some people, if they’re out of their normal routine, say on a weekend, holiday, or vacation, they get stuck and lose their momentum. They may not be thinking creatively of what they can come up with to do. Or they may have a pretty simple life of work and the basic home life. Or they keep so busy at their jobs, that there’s no time to develop hobbies or outside interests, so when they do have that rare free time, they don’t know what to do with themselves.


    You Can Either Worry or Be Grateful–Not Both

  • DifferencesIf you consider yourself a “worry wart” it may not be your fault. You probably grew up raised on worry. It was a common theme of those raised in the post WWII era. If our parents weren’t worried about money, they worried about our getting into an accident or getting good grades in school or you name it.

    I once heard a great definition of worry: it’s negative goal setting. That’s because worry is always about the future, and none of us can really predict the future. It’s such wasted energy that could be constructively used to make the present a lot better. Reign in your overactive imagination. Imagine instead using the energy you would have expended on worry to envision a positive future.


    What’s Your Living Style?

  • living

    Type the words ‘living style’ and any combination of other related keywords into Google and you get a list of sites about home design, fashion, cars, pets and all the newest trends associated with them. These are the accumulated trappings that reflect our lifestyle. Lifestyle is the visible evidence of our preferences, our tastes, our wealth. So what kind of question is “What’s your living style”? And why give it your attention?

    Well, the word ‘living’ is the present participle of the verb ‘live’. It suggests activity and interactivity. What we are doing, experiencing, living, now. If you’re like most working folk in mainstream society your present reality is a balancing act between work stress, family responsibilities, friendships and untold other obligations. And if you’re like most basically stable but somewhat frazzled folk, the prolonged strain often leaves you with a vague but troublesome sense of disconnect from your soul’s center.


    Taking Your Networking Online

  • by David Bohl

    The practice of networking is one of those essential elements of life we often take for granted, since we do it naturally. Essentially, I see networking as connecting with people, exchanging ideas, and building relationships. Since early man, networking has been a practical tool for forming alliances with others to trade and share resources. Today networking can be a business marketing tool or a way for people to connect for social purposes.

    I know some businesses that use networking as their exclusive marketing vehicle. It’s a highly effective way for people to build relationships for mutual benefit to either do business directly or to refer business. We’ve all heard the saying, “it’s not what you know but who you know.” Well, networking gives us an opportunity to meet those who can be influential to our business. And I’m sure you’ve also heard that people like to do business with people they “know, like, and trust.” Through networking, you can build the “know, like, and trust” factor as you meet and work with people on an ongoing basis.


    The Two Most Powerful Words: Thank You

  • thank-youHow often do you tell someone “thank you”? I’m not talking about the every day manners when someone holds a door or lets you go in front of them in the supermarket. What about the friend who is always there for you to listen to your woes? How about the boss who gives you extra time off to take care of crises with your children? What about the parents who helped you out with your first house?

    And what about the little things? The children who put their breakfast dishes in the sink? The spouse who lets you sleep in on Sundays? The neighbor who always has that extra egg you seem to run out of?

    How often do you say “thank you” to these gifts in your life? Sometimes we start to take people for granted and expect them to be there for us. But think about how you feel when someone tells you how much they appreciate you. Doesn’t it make you want to do more because you know they really noticed what you did? It’s not that anyone does nice things for others for the praise. They do it because they want to. But your appreciation is the least you can do to pay them back. And it really motivates people to do even more.


    How to Say No

  • no1by David Bohl

    We’ve become a culture of “yes people:” “Yes, I can stay late to help with your project.” “Yes, you can have that expensive themed birthday party with the live ponies.” “Yes, let’s go out for drinks on Friday.” “Yes, I’m available to help you move tomorrow.”

    Why is it so difficult to turn down a commitment these days? I have a theory – I think it’s because technology makes it almost impossible for us to hide! Back in the old days, you could become unavailable for a little while if you needed a mental vacation. But now, it seems like wherever you go, someone’s showing up with an invite or a request – texting you, emailing you, leaving you voicemails, messaging you on Facebook or wherever else, ready to hold you accountable. And worse… while you’re juggling all those priorities, even more obligations and temptations keep popping up.


    The Power in Being Prepared

  • Cub ScoutsRemember the Boy Scout motto: “Be prepared”? That seems to be a good maxim to remember in today’s troubled economic times. The problems each of us faces can seem insurmountable… and we wonder if others are suffering as we are, wrapped up in our own struggles.

    However, there are those of us who might be asking the question, “What part do I have in my problems? How have I contributed to them? Better still, what can I do to surmount them? The more aware you become of your own power, the more you will ask questions like these. And the more the answers will come to you.